The thickness planer can joint a board's face. On this simple jig, the stock is supported by twin rows of wood screws driven into a platform and adjusted to meet the varying clearances on the underside of the board. The stock rides the sled cup side up. Slide the board slightly sideways to adjust the screws, then seat it firmly on the screw heads for planing.
A quality wood moisture meter is vital to the long-term success of any woodworking project you put together. Lumber mills try to dry their batches of lumber according to the intended end product destination. That is, if the wood is harvested in the wet Northeast, but is going to be shipped to the arid Southwest, it will be dried more than wood kept in the Northeast for use by woodworkers. The success of your woodworking project, from wood flooring to kitchen cabinets to fine furniture, depends on the correct moisture content levels of the woods you use for your area of the country.
How about a hunk of butcher block counter top on a 4X4 (legs) base on locking wheels.  Round over the good side and it is a rolling kitchen stand - chopping block -  island.  Flip the top over, lock the wheels, and it's a bench.  There is a vise that is sold by Woodcraft that drops onto a mounted post in both vert and horiz positions that would be perfect for a small flip top bench.  The post would be mounted to the underside, unseen till the top was flipped and the vise dropped on.  It pivots but when the jaws are clamped it is tight.
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On the 100/300 grit combo stone: absolutely, positively NO – and I’m a woodworker by training who sees sharpening of tools as a means to an end and not as a religion. DMT bench stones are soooo cheap in the US (they cost as much as 3 times as much in ROW) that you should not waste (expensive) time with Chinese carborundum stones or EZ-Lap …err … junk.
Improving an item with a Resin increases the effective item level by 3. For example, a white quality Oak Bow at level 16 will, once improved with Pitch, have an effective item level of 19. Improving it again with Turpen, will make the effective item level 22. You will notice in the Weapon and Armor tables that the Superior value at level 16 is the same as Normal at level 22. This is important to note, since several Crafted Sets have break points where their bonuses increase based upon "effective level".
After you have chosen the perfect table saw for your wood shop, the next major purchase one should consider would be a compound miter saw. While not as expensive as a quality table saw, a compound miter saw is invaluable for cutting compound angles (beveled, mitered and combination cuts) on the ends of a piece of stock. Once you develop your ability to make precise cuts with a compound miter saw, you'll find that your circular saw spends a little more time in the drawer than it used to.
Repurposed materials are taken from their original intent and utilized in another fashion. This refers to barn beams or siding, old wood floors, paneling or even wood pallets that had an original purpose, but are then transformed into something completely new. The possibilities are endless, as every repurposed piece has a little piece of history that comes along with it, and gives unbelievable character to the new project.
Saws (I'm not a fan of Japanese saws, but you can buy good new ones pretty cheap.  ) - 1 crosscut handsaw (can be a Stanley "Sharktooth" toolbox saw from Home Depot or Lowes $15).  1 rip handsaw (used ones can be found at Antique stores for $20 or less.  Try to find one that is fairly sharp to start with).  Dovetail saw (Crown has a decent gent's saw for around $25 or get the Lee Valley Veritas Dovetail saw for around $70, Highland Woodworking carries both).  A crosscut backsaw and small miterbox is also handy to have, I can't give you a recoomendation for inexpensive ones though.
What better way to continue our #2x4andMore week on the 4th of July than with 4x4s! 4×4 wood posts are good for more than just fences and beams. We’ve rounded up 15 of our favorite 4×4 wood crafts to inspire your DIY creativity. You can buy brand new 4×4 posts at your local hardware store or find 4×4 scrap wood. Either way you’ll only need to a few more materials to make your 4×4 wood crafts into a reality.
Your moisture meter should have settings on it that will account for different species of wood. For instance, oak is a hardwood, but ebony is an even harder density wood. If you are planning an inlay job using both types of wood, you will need to know the moisture content levels of each of the two species so that your inlay glue joints will stay intact. These different wood species have different specific gravities, which must be used or programmed into the moisture meter.
You need an out-feed table to support work exiting the table saw and band saw. By placing the tools close together, I was able to make one out-feed table that works for both tools. I put four pivoting wheels on the table, allowing me to shift the table in any direction. By placing a shelf below the table, I gained some much needed storage space for portable power tools. Finally, since this is a large work surface, the table also serves as a true, flat assembly table.
If you’re looking to setup a shop equipped mainly with stationary power tools, I’d focus the bulk of your budget on the primary big tools. It’s easier to come up with $10 for a couple of clamps as an impulse purchase, than it is $1000 for a good table saw (TS). Most shops feature the TS, and that’s where I’d focus the bulk of my research and budget, unless you’ll primarily be using a band saw (BS). The biggies for me would be a good full size stationary table saw, planer, jointer, router and router table, and maybe a modest DC (like the HF unit for $150). With those main tools, you can build just alot using dimensional lumber or sheetgoods. A BS and DP are nice, but can be added down the road…in the meantime, a modest jigsaw and handheld power drill worked fine for early on. You’ll want a reasonable work surface, whether it’s a nice bench, or an old door. I’d add a good tape measure, squares, a chisel or two, sandpaper, and some basic clamps, then would add more clamps, block plane, and other extras as you go. (Ask family members for gift cards to Rockler, Woodcraft, Amazon, Lowes, HD, etc….). $3k is doable if you’re selective….the used market can be your friend if the right deals come along.
Thanks for the acknowledgement. My goal is for viewers like yourself to be able to focus 100% on the video’s content, woodworking. Most woodworking apprentices will ask the journeyman to show them how it is done. At the same time, many beginning woodworkers do not know what questions to ask. By showing you on the video, you are able to think for yourself and to also formulate important questions to ask. With that said, the more you watch each video, the more you will learn about woodworking skills and techniques. (some things in the videos are subtle that you may not pick up on the first viewing.)

Assume that there aren’t any decent tools on craigslist or at garage sales, and keep in mind that I have absolutely no tools, dust collection, shop-vac, clamps, sanding & painting accessories, tables, materials to build my own tables/stands/jigs, or anything else—not even safety gear (you’re such a good buddy that you even let me borrow your extra set of goggles and your earmuffs when I used to come over).

A long-established channel with Italian-American woodworking geek Marc Spagnoli and his sidekick Nicole.   It's filled with great tutorials, guides, reviews and generally high quality content.  I'd described as aimed at an improving, and committed, woodworker - he uses fairly lots of clamps and glue, and shows in professional how to build quality pieces, generally of furniture.  I learned a huge amount from here, and it's easy bedtime viewing.  

Just had a bad experience with shipping of an order and customer service was totally indifferent. ... In spite of requesting that all orders be shipped via UPS they decided to ship this order UPS and then have USPS make the final delivery. Since USPS doesn't deliver to the address on the package it is lost somewhere with USPS. It's been 2 weeks now and I had to order from another supplier and pay for next day air shipping. You guys just lost my business! See More
You need an out-feed table to support work exiting the table saw and band saw. By placing the tools close together, I was able to make one out-feed table that works for both tools. I put four pivoting wheels on the table, allowing me to shift the table in any direction. By placing a shelf below the table, I gained some much needed storage space for portable power tools. Finally, since this is a large work surface, the table also serves as a true, flat assembly table.
The second big tool you need is a saw. There are many types of saws, and this can be the trickiest part of setting up a shop on a budget. As a beginner, you'll likely be using woodworking books, magazines and websites for instruction and inspiration. Unfortunately, most of these sources consider a table saw a beginner tool. For those of us on a budget, or with little space, a table saw may not be an option. They cost several hundred dollars to start, and take up several square feet of floor space. Instead, look for a good circular saw that allows you to adjust the depth and angle of cut. It's also nice to have a laser to help guide the cuts. You can get a decent circular saw for around $100.
In fact when I first met her she had walked away from a construction job building three story apartment housing.  One day they were working on the third floor with a fairly high wind , and speaking of plywood, there were stacks of plywood up there and she tried to tell the guys they needed to secure the plywood or they would start to take off like playing cards.
Another example is lathe tooling or metal gravers which are routinely polished on fine agate stones and these don’t chip or roll an edge unless abused. These are one of the times where a jig is a requirement for reproducible results and a couple degrees off the recommended angle can make a difference. For a wood work, a couple degrees either way won’t really be noticed.
Let’s start with perhaps the most basic tool in every household – the claw hammer. The claw on one side of the head should be well counterbalanced by the finished head, which should be somewhat rounded. The other kind of head is the waffle-head. Most commonly used in construction, it leaves a distinctive waffle mark on the wood when you drive the nail. This, of course, is not the proper nail for woodworking.
I place the band saw first in my order of purchases, because I consider it the heart of the shop. Band saws are very safe tools for ripping, re-sawing, cutting curves and more because all of the force is downward, virtually eliminating any chance of unexpected kickbacks. I wanted a saw that had a strong back, dynamically balanced cast iron wheels for smooth operation and flywheel effect, 12" depth of cut, good dust extraction design, a large table and a solid fence. After shopping around, I settled on the General International Model 90-170 14" saw. It is very smooth, comes with an Excalibur fence, and it is light enough (133kg) to move into your basement without crushing someone.
About Youtuber The English Woodworker Blog aims to share with you our passion for traditional woodworking and keep you up to date with the goings on in and around our workshop. We are the owners of ’Maguire Workbenches’ and spend much of our time designing and building high quality workbenches so no doubt there will always be a lot of workbench talk.
About Youtuber My name is Andrei. I live in Russia and run my small business. Woodworking is my passion. I am the only woodworker in the shop. It is my full time job. I make only end grain cutting boards. I've been making end grain cutting boards for years. Sometimes I make end grain chessboards, end grain jewelry boxes, etc. Also I prepare woodworking plans.
Not many YouTube woodworking channels are run by guys who also happen to have PhD’s in medicinal chemistry, but this one is. Brian Grella’s channel offers a mix between more atmospheric videos that aren’t heavy on explanations (as the one shown above), and ones that are firmly in how-to territory, like this one for making a beautiful wooden bowl using nothing but a router and a drill press (no lathe required):
But until then, I’ve been thinking of other ways to use my hands and create things.  (Even though many of our saws and tools have been stolen.) But I’m feeling a little antsy to make some quick projects, because creating makes me extremely happy…..so we’re calling this surge in me to create something simple, THERAPY.  In fact, I need to call up a few friends and have them make some with me because friends and creating is a favorite combo of mine!  (Any out of town-ers want to fly in?! ;) )
About Youtuber LAB11 Created designer furniture from scratch from wood and recycled materials like pallets or customizes and repairs existing furniture. The watchwords for our creations and customizations are: Pretty, durable and solid things. Here are the videos of some projects creations but also of layout of the workshop, A video per month out at least.

One purchase that did work out in my favor this year was a bandsaw. I found an old, built in 1946, 14" Delta bandsaw w/ riser block in good condition for a steal at $150. I had a couple months of free spend saved up, and my wife threw in the rest of the money and considered it my birthday gift. Attached to the saw's base was an old Stanley 77 dowel maker the seller gave me with the saw since it was attached to the base when he got the saw. I was able to sell it on ebay for just shy of $300. I actually made money on that deal, and the money from the sale has allowed me to buy blades and upgrades for the bandsaw, as well as the parts and materials I need to build the router table I'm in the process of building. Was nice to get that - otherwise it would be months before I'd be able to purchase some of those things!


@jayemel: tempered glass works perfectly, as the (theoretical) fluctuations in flatness as a result of inner stress are several orders of magnitude smaller than the significant variations of thickness of your sandpaper. Unless you want to reflect the light of distant galaxies off the bevel of your chisel and measure their red-shift, you will be fine (and safer) to use tempered glass.

That just reminded me of a FWW piece many years ago that had me rolling on the floor.  Craftsman had built a large piece being delivered to an apartment on the top floor.  Couldn't get it on the elevator so they got controll of the elevator and ran the top of it to be even with the floor, loaded the piece on the top of the car and rode with it inside the shaft while balancing it and keeping it from hitting the shaft walls.  At some point in the trip up they lost control of the elevator and it started making trips up and down to other floors.  I'll see if I can find it.

@jayemel: tempered glass works perfectly, as the (theoretical) fluctuations in flatness as a result of inner stress are several orders of magnitude smaller than the significant variations of thickness of your sandpaper. Unless you want to reflect the light of distant galaxies off the bevel of your chisel and measure their red-shift, you will be fine (and safer) to use tempered glass.
The problems  that we least expect.  Five years ago i purchased a bicycle and discovered while riding that I had developed balance problems.  I ignored the problem and stopped riding the bicycle.During this period I built a workshop in my basement and stocked with the best handtools.  My lifelong dream was to be an anarchist!  In February 2012 I started having episodes of more severe balance problems which resulted in hospitalization and extended nursing home rehabilitationl for six months. The diagnoses is Parkinson Disease which causes muscles to react to unwanted brain signals.  Needless to say the therapist ordered "no woodworking" period" because of the hazards associated with machines and sharp tools.  I presented my case that I did only handwork with hand tools.  The therapist answer was "NO!".  Now I'm confined to using a walker or wheel chair and reading how you all are enjoying the smell of sawdust.
Your moisture meter should have settings on it that will account for different species of wood. For instance, oak is a hardwood, but ebony is an even harder density wood. If you are planning an inlay job using both types of wood, you will need to know the moisture content levels of each of the two species so that your inlay glue joints will stay intact. These different wood species have different specific gravities, which must be used or programmed into the moisture meter.

The router—The router is the master when it comes to flexibility. Its potential far exceeds trimming and decorative edge treatments. A router will cut mortises, rabbets, and dadoes, and adding a router table builds in even more versatility, including biscuit joinery and raised-panel doors. But where the router distinguishes itself from all other tools is in its ability to produce identical parts using a pattern.
Once you have the four aforementioned handheld power tools in your arsenal and you've had time to get comfortable with using them, its time to make your first (and likely most important) major tool purchase. The table saw is the heart and soul of every woodworking shop, the centerpiece around which all of the other tools are used and organized, so you'll want to buy the best table saw that your budget can comfortably afford. Take the time to learn which features you really want and the table saw that best fits your budget and your needs. This article will show you the most common features, and how to determine what features you need and how to know if those features are really well built, or simply added on to the saw because they are selling features.
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