But until then, I’ve been thinking of other ways to use my hands and create things.  (Even though many of our saws and tools have been stolen.) But I’m feeling a little antsy to make some quick projects, because creating makes me extremely happy…..so we’re calling this surge in me to create something simple, THERAPY.  In fact, I need to call up a few friends and have them make some with me because friends and creating is a favorite combo of mine!  (Any out of town-ers want to fly in?! ;) )
The circular saw is pretty much the first tool I grab for any project. You can use it for both rough cutting your lumber to get started on a project or making finish cuts before final assembly of your project. You can use it to make half lap joints and a variety of other joinery methods. While a table saw or stationary miter saw might make a certain task easier, it is hard to beat the cost, portability, and versatility of a circular saw. While most of these come with a blade, here is a good all-around blade that I use.
Not many YouTube woodworking channels are run by guys who also happen to have PhD’s in medicinal chemistry, but this one is. Brian Grella’s channel offers a mix between more atmospheric videos that aren’t heavy on explanations (as the one shown above), and ones that are firmly in how-to territory, like this one for making a beautiful wooden bowl using nothing but a router and a drill press (no lathe required):
As far as advice goes, I'm like a lot of the other folks on this thread; make a shop budget that fits into your existing budget and stick to it. Whenever you can foresee a larger expense, skrimp and save, cut costs in other areas of non-essential spending, and accept that sometimes, you NEED to go outside of your budget. In my experience, if it means enough to you, you can make it work. Good luck! 

Poplar is one of the less expensive hardwoods. It’s also fairly soft, considering it is a hardwood, which makes it easy to work with. Poplar is very light in color (almost “white”) with some green or brown streaks in the heartwood (the wood that comes from the center of the tree). Because poplar is not the most beautifully grained wood, it’s almost always painted as it does take to paint very nicely for a uniform finish. Poplar makes for great table bases (often painted, with a stained tabletop of a different wood), drawers, cabinets, hutches and more. Poplar is a very common wood that is versatile and cost efficient.

Not only is having a full time job is hard to do woodworking, if you have a family as well, then that is another thing that you are going to have to juggle as well.  For me its a no brainer.  I always choose my family over my hobby of woodworking.  But when my family or job does not need my presence, that’s when I am free to let my brain just run loose on new ideas of what to build next.
Woodworking is a fun hobby, but can be expensive as well. With all the power tools, hand tools, shop setups and, of course, the wood, many people are turned off to woodworking because of the impact on their wallets. That doesn’t have to be the case though. With a little pre-planning and inside knowledge, you can set up a basic wood shop and start making your own items without breaking the bank.
The directions that you'll find for making this Jack-o-lantern are found at HGTV, and they suggest using a battery operated votive to light up the lantern. I believe I'd try to figure out a way to add the "light" part of an inexpensive solar yard light instead. That way the jack-o-lantern would light as soon as it got dark. I wonder if that would work?
If you had bothered to watch the video this would have been explained. The cupping you see is a result of mass manufacture. Few tool makers will take the time to lap the back of a chisel to degree a craftsman will (much less the bargain brand he’s using). It’s simply not practical for them to do so and still make their price point. Some higher end (Lee Nielsen, Lee Vally, Veritas) chisels will be closer but even these will require some degree of hand honing/lapping. Using a flat stone, with at most couple hours of practice, you will reliably create razor sharp straight edges.
The router—The router is the master when it comes to flexibility. Its potential far exceeds trimming and decorative edge treatments. A router will cut mortises, rabbets, and dadoes, and adding a router table builds in even more versatility, including biscuit joinery and raised-panel doors. But where the router distinguishes itself from all other tools is in its ability to produce identical parts using a pattern.
Thanks for the acknowledgement. My goal is for viewers like yourself to be able to focus 100% on the video’s content, woodworking. Most woodworking apprentices will ask the journeyman to show them how it is done. At the same time, many beginning woodworkers do not know what questions to ask. By showing you on the video, you are able to think for yourself and to also formulate important questions to ask. With that said, the more you watch each video, the more you will learn about woodworking skills and techniques. (some things in the videos are subtle that you may not pick up on the first viewing.)
Of course she was probably going easy on the driver.  Wouldn't have been pretty if my little angel had got her delicate little hammer wielding, ( that was pretty much before nail guns ), wrench turning, Judo throwing fallangies on him.  Did I mention my surfer girl's best girl friend was a black belt (and raced bicycles on an international olympic level )?
An assortment of chisels should be part of every workbench. Chisels are not just for wood carvers. Any woodworker will need chisels to clean out joints and saw cuts. Look for chisels made of high-alloy carbon steel or chromium-vanadium alloyed steel. Hardwood grips are best, especially if they have metal caps on them. This will keep the end of the handle from becoming malformed when you hammer on it.

Staining wood is a process of darkening the overall tone by adding pigment, or dye, to it. Stains come in all shades and colors, ranging from light golden oak to rich, dark espresso tones. This is a beautiful way to achieve the exact tone that will work best in your home or business and is a very common way to finish wood. Stains are applied by hand in our workshop, giving a natural finish to the wood and maintaining the integrity of the wood-grain by controlling the amount of stain that is applied. Stains are utilized for both interior and exterior applications, although not all wood species take to stain uniformly and evenly so there are some drawbacks. For the most part, stain is very good choice in the finishing process.

If you’ve been reading my regular blog, unbrokenfurniture.com, then you already know that I’m a novice furniture upcycler. Up until now I’ve been repairing and refinishing existing furniture. Lately I’ve been picking up more and more reclaimed wood and other raw materials, so I’ve decided to learn to build some furniture from scratch. Because building furniture from scratch doesn’t really fit with the theme of unbrokenfurniture.com, I’ve decided to keep these projects on a separate space, hence woodworkingwednesdays.com was born. I’m planning to post one new project each week (hopefully Wednesday).
Hardwoods come from deciduous, or broad-leaved trees, as opposed to softwoods, that are harvested from from evergreens. In general, the lumber derived from hardwood species are typically harder than softwoods, although there are exceptions (balsa wood is very light and soft, but is considered a hardwood). Most hardwood tree species lose their leaves in winter, and generally offer a much wider variety of colors and textures than softwoods. Typically, stock from hardwood species are a lot more expensive than those from softwoods.
2. Just the basics—I’ve used a compound miter saw, circular saw, jigsaw, band saw, router, table saw, drill, finishing sander, belt sander, Dremel, oscillating multi-tool, bar clamps, and a Shop-Vac. I haven’t used a planer, jointer, or lathe. I’ve never owned a table saw but have used a circular saw or improvised with a router for a few long cuts.
To get the most out of your router, you are going to want a router table.  You may find yourself asking if you really need one - if you do, check this post out.​  It's one of those purchases that you won't truly understand how valuable it is until you have one.  Given the budget of $2,500, I'd suggest looking at the Bosch RA1171 ($150).  If you want to see our favorite tables along with write-ups, check them out here. 

Once you have the four aforementioned handheld power tools in your arsenal and you've had time to get comfortable with using them, its time to make your first (and likely most important) major tool purchase. The table saw is the heart and soul of every woodworking shop, the centerpiece around which all of the other tools are used and organized, so you'll want to buy the best table saw that your budget can comfortably afford. Take the time to learn which features you really want and the table saw that best fits your budget and your needs. This article will show you the most common features, and how to determine what features you need and how to know if those features are really well built, or simply added on to the saw because they are selling features.
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