Frank Howarth is a unique guy - educated as an architect, but with practical woodworking skills to rival any journeyman.  He has the most enviable workshop of anybody I've seen, and his projects are aspirational on every level - creativity, originality, ingenuity, and craftsmanship.  He devotes a lot of time to talking about the layout and design of his ever-changing workshop, and there's a lot of clever ideas to steal and pass off as your own.   If you can't tell, I love Frank.  Oh, and his stopmotion videos are awesome. 

Paul Sellers’ videos cover a wide variety of woodworking topics. He has an active channel on YouTube where his most popular videos are on making a mortise and tenon joint and making a dovetail joint. He is also the presenter at Woodworking Masterclasses where he teaches members to make furniture using a minimum of tools and equipment. The list below is Paul’s latest videos on YouTube. We hope you will find them informative and helpful.


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Poplar is one of the less expensive hardwoods. It’s also fairly soft, considering it is a hardwood, which makes it easy to work with. Poplar is very light in color (almost “white”) with some green or brown streaks in the heartwood (the wood that comes from the center of the tree). Because poplar is not the most beautifully grained wood, it’s almost always painted as it does take to paint very nicely for a uniform finish. Poplar makes for great table bases (often painted, with a stained tabletop of a different wood), drawers, cabinets, hutches and more. Poplar is a very common wood that is versatile and cost efficient.
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Other important power tools—A good jigsaw will help get you through many tasks, particularly cutting curves, that would otherwise require a bandsaw. Look for one with blade guides that keep blade deflection to a minimum. A handheld drill is also essential. A quality corded drill is much less expensive than a cordless one, and will never leave you without a charge. Also look for a quality random-orbit sander with a provision for dust collection.
Matthias Wandel loves himself some precision engineering.  His craftsmanship is great, but he's more a Da Vince for his contraptions.  He tends to build his own tools, and he's very much a function over form guy.  There's geekery aplenty with maths, physics and all sorts of CAD wackiness - feast your eyes on the marble machines!  All seemingly done on a shoestring budget.  Genius is the word for Matthias.
Steve Ramsey.  He's an energetic, fast-talking eccentric whose built his channel based on projects that can be done without investing in fancy tools.  He trudges out a banged-up table saw from his garage, chops stuff up on the bed of his truck, and generally produces well-structured projects - even if I can't agree with his design aesthetic and color choices.  Lots of good stuff to learn and a great channel for someone starting out.  
Every woodworker needs a couple of levels. You probably won’t need one of the 6-foot levels used in construction, but 48” is a good length for many of the woodworking projects you’ll do. Usually, you’ll also need an 8” level too, usually known as a torpedo level. You’ll check the level and plum of your construction. Level means horizontal, and plumb is vertical.
Steve Ramsey makes woodworking fun. His YouTube Channel, Woodworking For Mere Mortals Building, shows Steve making cool stuff in his garage in Marin County, California. From games and toys to special holiday projects during his 12 days of "Craftmas" (wooden snowflakes!), Steve consistently puts out new DIY woodworking videos and projects every Friday.
The third tool for the beginner is the Jigsaw. A jigsaw allows the user to cut curved and circular patterns in stock. Sure, a band saw will likely be more accurate and can cut thicker stock, but for the beginner, the jigsaw (sometimes also referred to as a Sabre Saw) can be perfectly effective. For versatility, choose an orbital-action, corded jigsaw that feels good in your hand and has an easy blade changing system.

If you’ve been reading my regular blog, unbrokenfurniture.com, then you already know that I’m a novice furniture upcycler. Up until now I’ve been repairing and refinishing existing furniture. Lately I’ve been picking up more and more reclaimed wood and other raw materials, so I’ve decided to learn to build some furniture from scratch. Because building furniture from scratch doesn’t really fit with the theme of unbrokenfurniture.com, I’ve decided to keep these projects on a separate space, hence woodworkingwednesdays.com was born. I’m planning to post one new project each week (hopefully Wednesday).

Paul Sellers’ videos cover a wide variety of woodworking topics. He has an active channel on YouTube where his most popular videos are on making a mortise and tenon joint and making a dovetail joint. He is also the presenter at Woodworking Masterclasses where he teaches members to make furniture using a minimum of tools and equipment. The list below is Paul’s latest videos on YouTube. We hope you will find them informative and helpful.
The all-new JWBS-14DXPRO 14 in. Deluxe Band saw The all-new JWBS-14DXPRO 14 in. Deluxe Band saw from JET has been fully redesigned to meet the needs of today's most demanding woodworkers. Gone are the days of adding a riser block; this 14 in. band saw comes with a massive cast iron frame for increased power that makes it ...  More + Product Details Close

All in all, for whatever reason it is that you enjoy woodworking, then you always need to follow that passion.  There is always going to be obstacles to overcome, whether that be not enough money to buy your tools, or space to put those tools, or time to enjoy woodworking.  That is something that every person has to overcome.  Everybody has there own unique obstacles.
Ron Paulk is an extremely likeable mystery and I think he deserves 10x more subscribers than he has. I'm convinced he's a secret millionaire - he has a workshop in what seems to be the 20-car garage of a multi-million dollar mansion - which he claims belongs to a friend and he's only using it temporarily while they sell the house.  I think it's been five years now that he's been there.  But anyway, Ron is mainly a finish carpentry contractor - that's things like baseboard, fireplaces, kitchen cabinets etc.  He is a master craftsman.  What makes him unique is his approach to working - he is all about being portable, mobile and lightweight.  Every year he seems to fit out a new van or trailer as a mobile woodshop.  I've built Ultimate Workbench, Chop Saw station and fitted out a van following his designs.  He introduced me to Festool, which was a costly mistake for me!  I've built a lot of his projects, and I learned a whole lot along the way.

Once you have the four aforementioned handheld power tools in your arsenal and you've had time to get comfortable with using them, its time to make your first (and likely most important) major tool purchase. The table saw is the heart and soul of every woodworking shop, the centerpiece around which all of the other tools are used and organized, so you'll want to buy the best table saw that your budget can comfortably afford. Take the time to learn which features you really want and the table saw that best fits your budget and your needs. This article will show you the most common features, and how to determine what features you need and how to know if those features are really well built, or simply added on to the saw because they are selling features.
@jayemel: tempered glass works perfectly, as the (theoretical) fluctuations in flatness as a result of inner stress are several orders of magnitude smaller than the significant variations of thickness of your sandpaper. Unless you want to reflect the light of distant galaxies off the bevel of your chisel and measure their red-shift, you will be fine (and safer) to use tempered glass.
About Youtuber This channel features work done by Marsh Wildman of Wildman Technology & Fabrication. I'm a maker/artisan/technologist specializing in bringing the dreams of others to reality. If you can convey your concept to me, I can build it for you! We reclaim and upcycle when possible. Wood working projects. Plasma cutting and welding. Machine shop services, PROTOTYPING and setting up production lines.

I started Woodworking Wednesdays because I thought my woodworking projects didn’t fit in very well with my UnbrokenFurniture.com blog. However, more and more, the furniture I’m making on that blog is handmade reclaimed wood furniture. This has sort of made this blog redundant. I’m not putting out enough furniture pieces to populate both blogs, so I’m going to stop posting those here.


My first projects were making things from pallet boards. I cut the boards to size using my jig saw.  It’s not quite as good as using a miter saw, but it got me by for a while with sufficient results.  Even now that I have a miter saw, I still use my jig saw A LOT to make notches (like for my outdoor table), or fun designs (like these deer heads last Christmas).
Oak is one of the most widely used and respected hardwoods in furniture making. Available in two varieties — red and white — oak is very strong and also quite heavy. White oak is sometimes preferred for furniture making because it has a slightly more attractive figure than red oak, but either variety can give you a beautiful finish that stains very well. Oak can be used for almost any woodworking purpose, and is an excellent choice for pieces that will last a lifetime – literally! As they say, it is “solid as oak”!
A layout square, or combination square, comes in 6” and 12” sizes. Most woodworkers use the 6” model, simply because it’s easiest to carry around. Also, most of the stock you’ll use will be no bigger than 6” wide, so 12” is overkill. The layout square is a triangle that you can use to mark square cuts on stock. Once you measure the length of the cut, you line up the layout square with the edge of the board. The short side will give you a straight, square cut across the end grain. You can also measure off angles with the layout square. This helps when you’re trying to measure for a bevel on a table saw, or marking a cut for a miter saw. You can even use your layout square to determine an existing angle. Just be sure to buy one made of metal. The plastic ones are not only fragile, but they also can warp, making them pretty useless.
I started Woodworking Wednesdays because I thought my woodworking projects didn’t fit in very well with my UnbrokenFurniture.com blog. However, more and more, the furniture I’m making on that blog is handmade reclaimed wood furniture. This has sort of made this blog redundant. I’m not putting out enough furniture pieces to populate both blogs, so I’m going to stop posting those here.
The next important hand tool for the woodworker is an accurate tape measure. Get a retractable one that is at least 25 feet long. Any longer than that, and you start having problems getting it to roll back up. Since measurements on large scale projects can be very susceptible to even the most minute measurement variations, you’ll want to make sure the “hook” or tab at the end of the is firmly attached, with no give. When they get loose, you’ll have as much as 1/8” variation in your measurements. This can add up to some severe accuracy problems in the long run.
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