One of the great furniture woods, Mahogany has a reddish-brown to deep-red tint, a straight grain, medium texture and is moderately hard. It takes stain very well, but looks great with even just a few coats of oil on it. For an even more distinguished look, exotic African Ribbon-Striped Mahogany adds amazing grain and texture elements to this already beautiful species of wood.
The next thing to look at was how to order the list. Probably the most obvious was subscriber count (which is how it is ordered), video count was also a possibility. One thing I was looking at, was the subscribers to video ratio. For example the Channel Inspire To Make has 101,000 subscribers, but when you realize that they only have 20 videos, the subscriber to video ratio is very impressive. I really do recommend you check it out as the videos really are very well made.
Saws (I'm not a fan of Japanese saws, but you can buy good new ones pretty cheap.  ) - 1 crosscut handsaw (can be a Stanley "Sharktooth" toolbox saw from Home Depot or Lowes $15).  1 rip handsaw (used ones can be found at Antique stores for $20 or less.  Try to find one that is fairly sharp to start with).  Dovetail saw (Crown has a decent gent's saw for around $25 or get the Lee Valley Veritas Dovetail saw for around $70, Highland Woodworking carries both).  A crosscut backsaw and small miterbox is also handy to have, I can't give you a recoomendation for inexpensive ones though.
YouTube is a great place to watch DIY woodworking tutorials that give you visual walkthroughs on how to do woodworking projects from start to finish. YouTube videos can inspire you to experiment with new ideas and try out projects you had never dreamed of yourself. With 20 channels dedicated to bringing you new project ideas and even showing you how to do them, you will have plenty of projects to ponder. So it's time to open your scrap wood cabinet and get started on something new.
*any* glass made by the float glass process will have the same level of flatness (>95% of today’s colorless glass). However, thicker is better and I would see 5mm as the absolute minimum. When glass slabs get bigger/heavier their shards pose a real risk in case they crack. Therefore, 5 or 8mm tempered glass is what you should be looking for. If you can’t find tempered glass, cover the back with UV-stabilized (all weather) tape: this will hold the shards together and you don’t get any exposed edges.
In the rough is referring to the wood at its earliest stage in the woodworking process. When the wood is initially milled from very large logs into more workable slabs, it is then kiln-dried to reduce the moisture content. At this point, the wood is able to be machine planed to a finer finish or left in its more natural state. The wood, in its more natural state, reveals the unique tooth and saw marks from the mill, creating a more rustic look and feel in the wood.
We made the decision for my wife to be a stay at home mom - it was a decision we both felt was a good one before we ever even discussed it. Being a single income family does sometimes have financial drawbacks, but the blessings of my wife being a stay at home mom are blessings that money can't buy. Eventually, when our son (and any future children we may have) are in grade school, my wife will look at finding a job. She's also looking at the possibility of starting to do in-home daycare for 2 or 3 children in our home, which would bring in some extra money.
Often referred to as Douglas Fir, this softwood has a rather straight, pronounced grain that has a reddish brown tint to it and is moderately strong and hard for a softwood. Fir is most often used for construction building materials, however it’s inexpensive and can be used for certain aspects of furniture-making as well. It doesn’t have the most interesting grain pattern and doesn’t take stain uniformly, so it’s best when used in projects that require a painted finish.
2. Just the basics—I’ve used a compound miter saw, circular saw, jigsaw, band saw, router, table saw, drill, finishing sander, belt sander, Dremel, oscillating multi-tool, bar clamps, and a Shop-Vac. I haven’t used a planer, jointer, or lathe. I’ve never owned a table saw but have used a circular saw or improvised with a router for a few long cuts.
Ron Paulk is an extremely likeable mystery and I think he deserves 10x more subscribers than he has. I'm convinced he's a secret millionaire - he has a workshop in what seems to be the 20-car garage of a multi-million dollar mansion - which he claims belongs to a friend and he's only using it temporarily while they sell the house.  I think it's been five years now that he's been there.  But anyway, Ron is mainly a finish carpentry contractor - that's things like baseboard, fireplaces, kitchen cabinets etc.  He is a master craftsman.  What makes him unique is his approach to working - he is all about being portable, mobile and lightweight.  Every year he seems to fit out a new van or trailer as a mobile woodshop.  I've built Ultimate Workbench, Chop Saw station and fitted out a van following his designs.  He introduced me to Festool, which was a costly mistake for me!  I've built a lot of his projects, and I learned a whole lot along the way.
As far as sharp goes, I subscribe to the school of thought that you need to hone an edge to hold up to what is is going to be cutting. The more you hone an edge, the thinner it becomes. This makes it sharp, but it also erodes it’s physical strength. If you want to slice paper or shave the hairs off your arm, go happy with a 2000 grit polish. If you are going to be hogging through wood, that edge will round over very quickly. IMHO you are better with a 500 grit finish at the most, and usually I am totally happy with the result of the 360 diamond hone.
Non-Standard Miter Slots - This one is a downer.  One of the primary advantages of having a table saw is access to jigs that expand the saws functionality.  This is a major issue if you plan on buying after market jigs.  Given that we are limiting the cost of this buildout to $500, I am guessing that after market jigs are probably low on the priority list.  Your going to want jigs once you start researching what they enable you to do, my advice is to build your own - there are plenty of plans online.  
What tools are needed to start woodworking? Well, this list can vary greatly depending on your budget. The best beginner woodworking tools are subjective but can vary largely depending on how much money you are willing or able to invest to start out in woodworking. It can also vary depending on if you are wanting to start out woodworking just as a hobby or as a side-hustle business. Most of the best beginner woodworking tools on this list are either tools I own, have owned, or at least have used in the past.

Every woodworker needs a couple of levels. You probably won’t need one of the 6-foot levels used in construction, but 48” is a good length for many of the woodworking projects you’ll do. Usually, you’ll also need an 8” level too, usually known as a torpedo level. You’ll check the level and plum of your construction. Level means horizontal, and plumb is vertical.


The Japanese style saw or Japan saw, depending on who you ask, can easily replace both the push saw and the dovetail pull saw for most of your needs. This is why I included the Japanese style saw in my woodworking budget starter kit. If I was starting over, and just going to buy one saw, this would be the one. I purchased an Irwin, but there are several other brands out there. I just found this one to be the best value at the time I was shopping.
One purchase that did work out in my favor this year was a bandsaw. I found an old, built in 1946, 14" Delta bandsaw w/ riser block in good condition for a steal at $150. I had a couple months of free spend saved up, and my wife threw in the rest of the money and considered it my birthday gift. Attached to the saw's base was an old Stanley 77 dowel maker the seller gave me with the saw since it was attached to the base when he got the saw. I was able to sell it on ebay for just shy of $300. I actually made money on that deal, and the money from the sale has allowed me to buy blades and upgrades for the bandsaw, as well as the parts and materials I need to build the router table I'm in the process of building. Was nice to get that - otherwise it would be months before I'd be able to purchase some of those things!
Ok, the leap from $1,000 to $2,500 is a big one.  I certainly didn't make it at one time.  It took me years.  But I know folks that decided they wanted to get into woodworking and dropped at least $2,500 getting themselves outfitted.  When you do make the jump, the thought process becomes much less about making sure you can get the job done and becomes more about having quality tools to get the job done.
Those two tools comprise the most basic power tools you need to start woodworking. In addition, you'll need some hand tools. A hammer is an obvious necessity, and can be bought cheaply. A tape measure is a must- have for marking out lengths. A ruler or straight edge is needed to turn your measurements into straight lines for cutting, and can be clamped to a work piece to use as a saw guide. Speaking of clamps, they are important for joining pieces together for gluing, screwing or nailing. Most woodworkers have a lot of them, and you'll never have as many as you need. For now, just buy a few 6-inch and 12-inch clamps and add more as you need them.
My name is Marc Spagnuolo and welcome to my channel. I am a podcaster, video producer, author, and woodworking enthusiast. I have contributed articles and video content to FineWoodworking.com, Popular Woodworking Magazine and WOOD Magazine. Producing the Wood Whisperer is a great way for me to combine four of my passions: woodworking, technology, education, and humor. I believe that even the most complicated woodworking project is just a series of steps. My goal with this channel is to show you the tools and techniques you need to perform those steps.
As far as advice goes, I'm like a lot of the other folks on this thread; make a shop budget that fits into your existing budget and stick to it. Whenever you can foresee a larger expense, skrimp and save, cut costs in other areas of non-essential spending, and accept that sometimes, you NEED to go outside of your budget. In my experience, if it means enough to you, you can make it work. Good luck!
An assortment of chisels should be part of every workbench. Chisels are not just for wood carvers. Any woodworker will need chisels to clean out joints and saw cuts. Look for chisels made of high-alloy carbon steel or chromium-vanadium alloyed steel. Hardwood grips are best, especially if they have metal caps on them. This will keep the end of the handle from becoming malformed when you hammer on it.

The directions that you'll find for making this Jack-o-lantern are found at HGTV, and they suggest using a battery operated votive to light up the lantern. I believe I'd try to figure out a way to add the "light" part of an inexpensive solar yard light instead. That way the jack-o-lantern would light as soon as it got dark. I wonder if that would work?
Screwdrivers are another must-have in the woodworker’s set of hand tools. Not only will you need Phillips and slot, or flathead screwdrivers, you’ll need star drivers and Torx drivers, too. A quality construction is vital to a good set of screwdrivers. So many of them are made out of soft metal, and the first time you put any “oomph” behind them, they strip out, becoming absolutely useless.
After years of digging down under router tables, lifting the entire unit up to change bits, and then fighting to get the plate flush again in the table, I chose to spend the money to pur­chase a router table, fence, and lift system. I did a thorough review of these systems, and chose the Canadian made Jessem Rout-R-Lift II kit. The system comes with a solid steel stand, a phenolic table, an adjustable extruded aluminum fence, and their base model lift system. For budget reasons, I did not choose the hefty Mast-R-Lift, but I am quite happy with the lighter Rout-R-Lift II. It will last me a couple of lifetimes, so it is the right system at the right price for me in my one-man shop. Hats off to Jessem for making a great lift at a very rea­sonable price in the middle of a tough economy. The table is durable, and flat. The direct drive lift is smooth and precise. I mated the lift system to a mid-sized model 690 Porter Cable router, which has a fixed speed, and enough power to do any­thing I need. The Jessem system uses a bayonet type mount for the table inserts, a nice touch that makes swapping the table insert quick and simple. As with all my machines, the router table is connected with the supplied dust port to my shop dust collection system with automated switching. 

All you need to get an edge on your hand tools and pocket knives is a 100/300 grit combo stone from your local hardware, even horrible fright. This shouldn't cost more than $10. Then go to the natural slate section of the home center or flooring store & find 3-4" natural slate tile that you can barely see the grains in. This should cost another $1 or so. This tile is roughly 800 grit. If you can't find natural tile in your area, you should be able to find an 'Arkansas' stone for <$5. If you can scare up some Chrome Oxide and a piece of leather (piece of cardboard or block of MDF also work) all the better. These three things will cost you $15 and get your edged tools sharp enough to take hair off your arm and chips of your lumber. 

We’ve already done rope, and now we’re on to another rustic material we love: wood! It’s as basic of a material as clay and is constantly reinvented by DIYers, crafters, artists, hackers, and carpenters. To get inspired to create our own batch of cool wooden objects, we turned to our favorite fellow makers to see what projects they’ve come up with. Scroll down for our top DIY wood project picks.
This is known as the “Scary Sharp” method and I first learned of it on Usenet back in the day. I’ve had pretty good luck only going up to 2000 grit automotive paper. That stuff is commonly available near the spraypaint at Wally-world. At this grit, I can easily shave the hair on my forearm. For a plate, I use a single 12×12 tile from a Big Box store.

I wouldn’t give up on Craigslist or garage sales.. For around $1K or less, you can pretty easily find the four big ticket items (TS, BS, Jointer and Planer) and have the extra $2K to spend on accessories, material, DC, other goodies, etc. The key is patience and persistence, and if applied correctly, you can have a fantastic setup for very little compared to purchasing new. If you are setting up a business, you don’t usually have the time to scour for good deals, but for a personal shop, there is no pressing need other than that itch to get something done. 
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