Just like a hammer and tape measure, a drill is something a lot of people already keep on hand for small household projects. Danny and I started out on a SUPER cheap drill when we first got married and quickly learned that this was not something to cheap out on.  If you plan to do much woodworking, invest in a quality drill.  It doesn’t have to be the best of the best, but do at least get a mid-grade drill.
Check with Habitat for Humanity.  If they have a store you may find several good items such as a bench, bandsaw or etc.  When I retired and moved I donated  a complete shop full of woodworking power tools and hand tools to Habitat.  They sold them, I deducted them from my income tax.  Unfortunately I could not retire my desire to woodwork and at age 78 I built a shop and use only hand tools and a bandsaw.  Good exercise pushing  a LN #7.   Build yourself a solid bench with some southern pine with a moxon vise that can be built by hand.  Get some holddowns!
But until then, I’ve been thinking of other ways to use my hands and create things.  (Even though many of our saws and tools have been stolen.) But I’m feeling a little antsy to make some quick projects, because creating makes me extremely happy…..so we’re calling this surge in me to create something simple, THERAPY.  In fact, I need to call up a few friends and have them make some with me because friends and creating is a favorite combo of mine!  (Any out of town-ers want to fly in?! ;) )
This is the one tool in the shop that provides the greatest opportunity to save money, if you are willing to purchase a well made, light duty machine, and take lighter cuts. In the past I have used General 14" planers that can hog off seri­ous cuts all day long. The problem is that these professional units cost over $5000, and they would crush my buddy as we haul them down the stairs (note: don’t be the guy on the bot­tom). After doing a fair amount of research, I purchased the Dewalt DW735 13" thick­ness planer. The unit came with a good manual, and was in a good state of tune. It is light enough for me to carry around the shop with­out excessive grunting, so that made it very simple to install. The planer has a sig­nificant internal fan-assisted chip ejection system. The chips are catapulted out of this planer, so have your dust collector running before you run stock through it. I now have to make more cuts at a lighter cut depth, but I saved about $4500, which makes my budget happy. The planer makes clean cuts, and has two speeds. I don’t see a reason for the two speeds for my type of work, but there is a faster feed rate should you choose to use it. Knife changing is simple and quick.
Thinking about starting a crafts or DIY business? Take a look at these creative ideas using pallets, which have become very popular. One of the reasons many enjoy creating DIY ideas into DIY projects with pallets is there are so many different type of items and decorations that can be made from this rustic wood. Pallets are simply leftover wood and using them is a very eco-friendly and green thing to do. If you choose to make these crafts to sell, you’ll be pleased to discover that many pallet crafts can be created over a weekend. So give DIY pallet projects a try, there are so many here to enjoy! Happy Building and Selling!
Available in both water-based and oil-based finished, polyurethane is one of the most common practices used in woodworking today. Polyurethane can be sprayed, brushed or rubbed onto the piece to obtain either a satin, semi-gloss or glossy finishes. Polyurethane is a very versatile finish that will last for many years and is easy to clean and maintain.
First, let's dump that hand powered saw/miter box.  It gets the job done, but it takes forever.  We're still on a lean budget, but shelling out ~$110 for a 10 inch electric miter saw makes a lot of sense.  This won't be your forever saw, but it should do fine for most projects.  It can handle up to a 4x6 stock which will cover 99% of what a beginning wood worker will throw at it.  
Brian Grella builds DIY woodworking projects in his garage woodshop. He lives by the motto "Cars Live Outside." Brian works in his garage to build useful household items like guitar stands, pizza cutters and breakfast trays. In one of his videos, Brian shows how he made salad tongs and then eats a salad right there on camera to show off his wooden creations.
I do not rip on the table saw as a rule, to prevent kick back that periodically occurs when natural wood pinches the blade, turning the wood into a missile. I bought a fairly powerful saw, so this is one place where a lighter saw would be adequate. Essentially, I use the table saw for ripping sheet goods, cutting dados, tenons, and cutting small parts to length – all of which can be done with a 1.5 HP saw. I ended up with a King 3 HP, three-belt drive, 10" table saw. The castings are true, and the King Tru-rip fence reminds me of the Biesmeyer fence used on the Canadian General saws. The model is KC-11FX, and it can be purchased for less than half of the price of other, simi­lar saws. On this purchase, I went with the suggestion of Jeff at Brettwood Machinery – he was right; a very good value saw that runs smooth, and has a decent fence.
As a gardener/homesteader, and setting aside basic firewood tools (chain and bow saws, hatchet, axe, maul, sledgehammer and wedges), the most important woodworking tool I possess is the drawknife. This enables one to quickly and efficiently peel bark off of saplings and poles (which alone increases their durability outdoors, and is essential to prepare them for other uses), and is also good for rough shaping work....more accurate than a hatchet, and quicker than a chisel in many cases. I probably use my drawknife about as often as any of the basic carpenter's tools like a crosscut saw or an electric drill.
Carl Jacobson has created over 350 videos to overwhelm you with project ideas, some of which you can complete in less than an hour. He takes you through the entire process from preparing the wood to the sanding and finishing of the project. Carl releases a new video every Friday with a follow-up video every Monday to answer questions based on the feedback he received over the weekend. 

I set an initial budget of $10,000 to build the shop – everything from studs and drywall to hand tools and machinery. The final number was over by $1,000, but I’m still very happy with the result. The shop is now my haven, with a good sound sys­tem and good lighting. Every time I go back into the shop, it is exactly the way I left it, because it is my shop!
If you want to do any amount of bowl carving or other types of carving that will require removal of large amounts of stock, I can't recommend an angle grinder and chainsaw-tooth wheel in place of the abrasive wheel. I've used the Arbortech brand, but there are a few different brands and style available. I'm sure you could buy a used grinder for $20 or so.

For me, I watch Craigslist, and hit auctions. My g/f scored me a huge load of pallets (free wood is good wood, especially when projects made from it generate $$$), and I work in a high end window & door company, so the scrap bin gets raided quite often. I made a deal with myself to only buy what I can pay for from what the shop makes. This includes (at times) going without a needed tool as I was waiting for a better one because I had sold what I once had for more than I paid for it. Just like flipping houses, on a much smaller scale. Right place, right time.

Even the backside grinding shown in the single frame of the video shows the effects of hand held sharpening. There is a curve on the flat side of the blade! Starting to look like a spoon. It’s impossible to get a flat surface when using bones and tendons. This effect was exploited to make the first lens when done in glass. Telescope mirror grinders do it too using two different hardness of glass, if machine done it would be flat. If those “slate” tiles are flat they must be ground flat not baked. No need to check.
We made the decision for my wife to be a stay at home mom - it was a decision we both felt was a good one before we ever even discussed it. Being a single income family does sometimes have financial drawbacks, but the blessings of my wife being a stay at home mom are blessings that money can't buy. Eventually, when our son (and any future children we may have) are in grade school, my wife will look at finding a job. She's also looking at the possibility of starting to do in-home daycare for 2 or 3 children in our home, which would bring in some extra money. 

Tung oil is derived from the nuts of trees that are native to Asia but have been cultivated in other parts of the world. This is a durable finish that has a rather quick drying time and is very moisture resistant. Tung oil penetrates the woods surface, soaking deep into the wood grain for a fine finish. Tung oil is great for exterior furniture, tabletops and countertops.
The router—The router is the master when it comes to flexibility. Its potential far exceeds trimming and decorative edge treatments. A router will cut mortises, rabbets, and dadoes, and adding a router table builds in even more versatility, including biscuit joinery and raised-panel doors. But where the router distinguishes itself from all other tools is in its ability to produce identical parts using a pattern.
Then there are the “practical” woodworkers that enjoy weekend projects and things that don’t require a ton of expensive tools, time, and expertise (HELLO, THAT’S ME).  I will be in the latter category.  Sure, you can invest in hand tools, but in the words of one of my favorite internet sensations, “ain’t nobody got time fo that.”  Let’s be practical here. 

Now, I’m not crazy rich or anything. I know that’s still a lot of money, but you will be able to make SO many things with just these five tools you seriously won’t believe it.  And if you are just starting out, just buy one tool and try it out. You’ll be surprised how much you can make with just a jigsaw,  hammer, nails and a screwdriver.  I made tons of stuff!  All you have to do is get started…where there is a will there is a way. 🙂
My first projects were making things from pallet boards. I cut the boards to size using my jig saw.  It’s not quite as good as using a miter saw, but it got me by for a while with sufficient results.  Even now that I have a miter saw, I still use my jig saw A LOT to make notches (like for my outdoor table), or fun designs (like these deer heads last Christmas).
Thanks for the feedback. We’re glad you found the list helpful. Please note that this page contains only 10 of the 40 top tools for woodworking, displaying only hand tools. You can find the next 10 here: https://www.wagnermeters.com/top-40-woodworking-tools-2/. There are links at the bottom of each article to the next group of tools so you can view the entire list. Hope this helps.
One of the challenges in building a cabinet for hand tools, is that as soon as you define a place for each tool in your custom cabinet, you find that you need more room to store the must have tools you just bought. I decided to make a couple of open cabinets, and employ the use of inserts that can be replaced or modified as my tool collection grows. Part of the goal was to make a clean, efficient shop, while keeping to a budget. I bought paint grade maple plywood and made the cabinets. Applying a solid maple face frame to the cabinet makes a clean looking cabinet from sheet goods purchased at $50/sheet.
Let’s start with perhaps the most basic tool in every household – the claw hammer. The claw on one side of the head should be well counterbalanced by the finished head, which should be somewhat rounded. The other kind of head is the waffle-head. Most commonly used in construction, it leaves a distinctive waffle mark on the wood when you drive the nail. This, of course, is not the proper nail for woodworking.
The Japanese style saw or Japan saw, depending on who you ask, can easily replace both the push saw and the dovetail pull saw for most of your needs. This is why I included the Japanese style saw in my woodworking budget starter kit. If I was starting over, and just going to buy one saw, this would be the one. I purchased an Irwin, but there are several other brands out there. I just found this one to be the best value at the time I was shopping.
This is the one tool in the shop that provides the greatest opportunity to save money, if you are willing to purchase a well made, light duty machine, and take lighter cuts. In the past I have used General 14" planers that can hog off seri­ous cuts all day long. The problem is that these professional units cost over $5000, and they would crush my buddy as we haul them down the stairs (note: don’t be the guy on the bot­tom). After doing a fair amount of research, I purchased the Dewalt DW735 13" thick­ness planer. The unit came with a good manual, and was in a good state of tune. It is light enough for me to carry around the shop with­out excessive grunting, so that made it very simple to install. The planer has a sig­nificant internal fan-assisted chip ejection system. The chips are catapulted out of this planer, so have your dust collector running before you run stock through it. I now have to make more cuts at a lighter cut depth, but I saved about $4500, which makes my budget happy. The planer makes clean cuts, and has two speeds. I don’t see a reason for the two speeds for my type of work, but there is a faster feed rate should you choose to use it. Knife changing is simple and quick.

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I Like to Make Stuff is the perfect channel for beginners who want comprehensive teaching on woodworking. It has a show called Maker 101 that goes into the basic skills you need to start making stuff. I Like to Make Stuff is not intimidating to the beginner because it isn’t afraid of showing woodworkers making mistakes on their project rather than always doing everything perfectly.
Shop layout is all about making the best use of space. Place your machines so that you have adequate “safe space” that you need to work around them. The “buffer area” beyond that is the amount of room you need to run large stock though a given machine, keeping in mind that buffer areas can overlap between machines. If you want to get more organized, buy some 1/4-inch squared paper, make scale models of each machine including the safe space around each, and place them on your model shop layout. Remember that buffer areas need to be long enough to put an 8' sheet through a table saw, or a 6' plank through your planer, for instance. I raised my planer, so that I can use the area above my router table to pass long planks through the planer – all it takes is some modelling, and a little shuffling, and you will find the layout that works for you. Each space will have chal­lenges; I had the area under the stairs that was wasted space, so I installed the dust collector there.
I've been through many tools in that time and I rarely buy new. So many begin this hobby with a zillion tools but never use them. They wait about two years and sell. The best thing is the price but I also like the fact when she looks for my list items she finds so many other things that were future list items. I won't bore with good deal stories but I have many.

Repurposed materials are taken from their original intent and utilized in another fashion. This refers to barn beams or siding, old wood floors, paneling or even wood pallets that had an original purpose, but are then transformed into something completely new. The possibilities are endless, as every repurposed piece has a little piece of history that comes along with it, and gives unbelievable character to the new project.
Kids love DIY projects, especially when they get to give those projects away as gifts. You can help your little ones to make a great picture frame for Father’s Day with just a few twigs and a hot glue gun. Just glue the twigs to the frame and let the kids decorate however they want. Use burlap for the matting and add a special message with a Sharpie.
Woodworker's Supply is the expert's source for woodworking tools and hardware. We have the latest table saws, band saws, scroll saws, mortisers, jointers and planers for you to choose from. Looking for name brand cordless power tools or electric routers, router bits, and router accessories? We have a huge selection available. We represent the most respected brands on the market like Powermatic, DeWalt, Freud, Woodtek and many more. From traditional hand tools to high-tech digital measuring devices, we have what you need for the most intricate woodworking projects at woodworker.com.
Ready for fall? Fall is one of my favorite seasons (hello cute boots and cozy sweaters!), plus I love watching the leaves turn gorgeous colors. You can bring a bit of that colorful nature indoors this fall with some simple fall wood crafts. Just grab a few scraps of wood, some fallen branches, or some wood slices, and whip up these adorable fall crafts in no time!
At $300, the saw is expensive, but it is one of the more affordable saws that offer a 12 inch blade and a double bevel.  The double bevel allows you to adjust both the angle at which the blade cuts into the wood and the tilt of the blade relative to the workpiece.  Having control over both angles allows much easier cuts of trims and moldings.  It's one of those features that you won't use with every project - but when you do need it, you'll be glad you have it
When I was just getting started with woodworking, I didn’t know anything about saws. The standard push saw was the only hand saw that I had any experience with. So naturally this was the type of saw I bought. It works fine for making cross cuts, and can even be used to rip, if you don’t have a table saw or circular saw. However, I quickly realized that I needed something for more precision cuts.
The next hand tool every woodworker should have is a nail set. In fact, you should have several sizes. They look like awls, and you use them to drive nail heads into the wood so they are flush or right below the surface. This allows you to fill the holes and prepare for staining or painting. The nail setter will usually have either a convex or concave surface to grip the nail better and keep it from sliding off and marring the wood.
About Youtuber Jon Peters Art & Home teaches and inspires you to make art, woodworking, and home improvement projects at home. Whether you're a beginning artist, a practical do-it-yourselfer, or a professional craftsman, my videos will provide a how-to guide to great projects.I will show you the tools, plans, and tricks of the trade to bring art and design to your home.
Understand the pain. Retired, fixed income, bills to pay like anyone else. Most of the accumulated equipment is used, a few pieces bought new. Other detriment - WW is one hobby, home machining another, and welding/fabricating another, to say nothing of an electronics hobby. Add in no real shop, just enough garage space to house everything, and wheel each piece out on the drive to use. Bad weather = no work! Make a lot of my own stuff also, such as:
I've been through many tools in that time and I rarely buy new. So many begin this hobby with a zillion tools but never use them. They wait about two years and sell. The best thing is the price but I also like the fact when she looks for my list items she finds so many other things that were future list items. I won't bore with good deal stories but I have many.
That's it. That's all you really need to begin woodworking. Over time you will add more tools to your collection, like chisels, drill bits, a sander and, more clamps; but for right now you should be able to get started on most beginner projects. Don't be afraid to look online for second- hand tools. Old drills and circular saws work well when given proper care. With some ingenuity you can figure out how to adapt most plans to the tools you have available. People have been making wooden items throughout human history, and they didn't need expensive planers, biscuit joiners or fancy jigs. Start learning the craft, see if you like it, and have fun.
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Thanks for the feedback. We’re glad you found the list helpful. Please note that this page contains only 10 of the 40 top tools for woodworking, displaying only hand tools. You can find the next 10 here: https://www.wagnermeters.com/top-40-woodworking-tools-2/. There are links at the bottom of each article to the next group of tools so you can view the entire list. Hope this helps.
One of the best deals on portable power tools, including routers and sometimes planers, comes in the form of factory-reconditioned tools. These are primarily tools that have been repaired at the factory after failing quality inspections or being returned by customers. While they cannot be sold as new, they are identical to new tools in quality and appearance and usually feature the same warranty (be sure to check). Typical savings are anywhere from 15% to 30%, though you sometimes can find even bigger bargains. These tools can be found at Amazon.com and other online tool sellers. It is also possible to buy them through retail stores and, in some cases, directly from the manufacturer’s Web site.
It's funny how some interests (or trades) got onto YouTube very early.  Woodworking has been popular on there since the video-sharing behemoth got started.  I suspect this is because the US has a strong tradition of TV shows about woodworking - two great examples being Norm Abram's New Yankee Workshop and Roy Underhill's Woodwright Shop.  With a plethora of channels available on cable, and a bigger population, broadcasters were able to air more niche, and thus detailed shows.   Over in the UK we had four channels, and so if something wasn't going to appeal to at least 5% of the population (or it was cultural) then it didn't stand a chance.  

As far as advice goes, I'm like a lot of the other folks on this thread; make a shop budget that fits into your existing budget and stick to it. Whenever you can foresee a larger expense, skrimp and save, cut costs in other areas of non-essential spending, and accept that sometimes, you NEED to go outside of your budget. In my experience, if it means enough to you, you can make it work. Good luck!


This style of saw will provide more power than a contractor-type saw and have the high-quality rip fence you need to do good work. However, because they are favored by professionals and serious amateurs, cabinet saws are harder to find on the used market. Scour the classifieds and online sales (be sure to check industrial auction sites as well), and do some networking. Check the bulletin board at your hardwood supplier and ask the proprietors if they know of anyone selling a saw. Also call local cabinet shops. They sometimes have a surplus tool sitting idle that they’d be willing to sell. Take your time in this step. A careful investment will pay dividends in the long run, but a well-intentioned compromise can cause long-term frustration.
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I have a stable income like a said earlier, but when it comes to having extra cash to just blow on a hobby, well I was never always that fortunate.  So when I wanted a new tool or even to just purchase lumber, I would have to save up until I could purchase it.  I know that sounds like most people, but it has taken me several years to just even get the basic tools of woodworking. 
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