My shop ended up being 23 x 19 feet, for a total of 437 square feet. I put my wood rack in the basement, but out­side the walled in shop area. To keep the dust in the shop, a three part strategy was employed. I have a dust collection system, an air filtration system and a shop vacuum for cleaning dust out of machinery. I put up new walls, installed new electrical service, lighting, and two access doors for ease of materials move­ment. The shop includes two windows so that I can enjoy natural light, and not feel like I am squirreled away in the basement.
While an electric miter saw is a convenience, it is not necessary to do good work.  A quality electric miter saw will run around $150-$200, that by itself would destroy our budget.  A hand saw with a miter box does the job just as well at a fraction of the price.  This highly rated Stanley version for ~$60 should get the job done, albeit with a bit more elbow grease.
Second, it is easier to learn to use hand tools on a solid bench than on a Workmate or some other modern clamping sawhorse.  The bench doesn't have to be expensive or large.  A 20" by 5' top will get you started.  Look at Chris Schwarz's second book on Workbenches "The Workbench Design Book" for ideas.  If you are a good scrounger you can recycle framing lumber from building teardowns to build a good bench for next to nothing.  A vise screw to make a leg vise is less than $60.

Ok, the leap from $1,000 to $2,500 is a big one.  I certainly didn't make it at one time.  It took me years.  But I know folks that decided they wanted to get into woodworking and dropped at least $2,500 getting themselves outfitted.  When you do make the jump, the thought process becomes much less about making sure you can get the job done and becomes more about having quality tools to get the job done.
My contention has always been that you can build a serviceable shop in your home, develop your hand skills, and make fine furniture. In the past year, I had an opportunity to build a shop from the ground up after moving to a new home. I found a house with an unfinished basement, and set to work. In this article, I will discuss everything from layout, to electrical, to equipment selection. I intend to name names with respect to equipment, so that readers will know what I chose. Everyone’s budget will be different, but I think almost everyone will be able to treat this as a starting point, and adjust accordingly, depending on their own budget.
Pine is of the most common softwoods and comes in several varieties, including White, Knotty and Yellow – all of which can be used to make furniture. Pine is fairly easy to work with, as it is very soft, but it will show wear and tear more easily with everyday use (which could be a good or bad thing, depending on the look you prefer). Pine can either be stained or painted and often gives a more traditional feel to a piece – especially when using repurposed Pine flooring and siding. Pine is a practical and affordable choice for shelving, tables, closets, and cabinetry.

Steely blue walls and a few intricately placed wood slices will give your bathroom a great rustic look. You will need several wood slices to go all the way around the room and then just place them in geometric patterns or however you want. Thin wood slices will affix to the walls easily with wallpaper glue or you can use a hot glue gun if you prefer.


I was attracted to this page by the headboard. It looks great and it’s unique. I must disagree with the first sentence, that rustic is ‘in’ right now. I’m thinking, ‘It’s the great recession’. Any money I spend better get me the most refined thing I can afford. Kind of like how I believe that new store bought jeans with holes in them are going out of style like a cold cup of coffee.

I, too, would pass on the Jawhorse, and agree with the suggestion of a solid bench. (Remember, it can double as a desk if space is limited.)  A used solid-core door can be a starting point, but there are better options, such as laminating your own from scrounged 2x4s. Spending time at flea markets looking for old tools that can be reconditioned is a good suggestion, too.
Whether you are a beginner or a DIY professional, if you have a love for the craft of woodworking The Home Depot has got you covered. We have all the essential tools for woodworking that let you hone your craft. Our huge selection of drill presses and miter saws will put the power in your hands to complete your projects faster and easier. And whether you are looking for the strength of a powerful router or the versatility of a lathe, you can find everything you need to help with projects, large and small. If your carpentry plans also include building materials, you don't need to look any further than The Home Depot. From wood and lumber to decking and fencing materials, it's all right here.  

About Youtuber This channel features work done by Marsh Wildman of Wildman Technology & Fabrication. I'm a maker/artisan/technologist specializing in bringing the dreams of others to reality. If you can convey your concept to me, I can build it for you! We reclaim and upcycle when possible. Wood working projects. Plasma cutting and welding. Machine shop services, PROTOTYPING and setting up production lines.
Woodworker's Supply is the expert's source for woodworking tools and hardware. We have the latest table saws, band saws, scroll saws, mortisers, jointers and planers for you to choose from. Looking for name brand cordless power tools or electric routers, router bits, and router accessories? We have a huge selection available. We represent the most respected brands on the market like Powermatic, DeWalt, Freud, Woodtek and many more. From traditional hand tools to high-tech digital measuring devices, we have what you need for the most intricate woodworking projects at woodworker.com.
Just how small?  Will you have an extra bedroom for your shop or will you be doing woodworking in your living room?  Do you have to put the projects and tools away every time you want to entertain or will you leave everything set up all the time?  A while back FWW had a video tour of a shop in Japan that was smaller than small.  I'll try to find it and get back.  Found it...  shows what can be done in a small space but this shop was not on a small budget so no help there.
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